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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Sunday, January 21, 2018

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, January 21, 2018
  • 12:00 am
    Radiolab Birthstory You know the drill - all it takes is one sperm, one egg, and blammo - you got yourself a baby. Right? Well, in this episode, conception takes on a new form - its the sperm and the egg, plus: two wombs, four countries, and money. Lots of money. At first, this is the story of an Israeli couple, two guys, who go to another continent to get themselves a baby - three, in fact - by hiring surrogates to carry the children for them. As we follow them on their journey, an earth shaking revelation shifts our focus from them, to the surrogate mothers. Unfolding in real time, as countries around the world consider bans on surrogacy, this episode looks at a relationship that manages to feel deeply affecting, and deeply uncomfortable, all at the same time.
  • 1:00 am
    Freakonomics Radio Evolution, Accelerated Stephen J. Dubner explores a breakthrough in genetic technology that gives humans more power than ever to change nature. So what happens next?
  • 2:00 am
    To the Best of Our Knowledge Can An Evil Man Be a Decent Person? How can someone be a monster a brutal dictator, a mass murderer, a serial killer and up close seem like a decent, caring person? In this hour, tackle a complicated question: what happens when our moral categories fail and we find ourselves feeling empathy for monsters? Is that wrong? And what does it say about us?
  • 3:00 am
    To the Best of Our Knowledge Shame Social media has brought us all closer together. Sometimes that's a good thing. But when it comes to online shaming, it's a bad thing. People get humiliated on Twitter, savaged in public forums and women get rape and death threats. This hour, we explore our great renaissance of public shaming.
  • 4:00 am
    Living On Earth Year Of The Bird National Geographic, along with the National Audubon Society and other conservation groups, has declared 2018 the Year of The Bird to celebrate the centennial of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. National Geographic writer and novelist Jonathan Franzen is a keen birder who wrote Nat Geos January cover story. He tells host Steve Curwood how a walk in New York Citys Central Park opened his eyes to the pleasures of birdwatching, why the Treaty was necessary a century ago and the many perils that birds still face today.
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 10:00 am
  • 11:00 am
    Live From Here with Chris Thile John Prine, Sylvan Esso, Rory Scovel, and the Preservation Hall Jazz Band This week the show heads south for a live broadcast from the beautiful Saenger Theatre in New Orleans, right on the edge of the Vieux Carre. Joining in is the great John Prine, who got his start writing songs while holding down a postal route in Illinois. Over his nearly 50-year career, he's turned his incisive observations of American life into many of our most treasured songs. They'll also have music from electric duo Sylvan Esso, comedy from Rory Scovel, and -- after a triumphant appearance at the Fitzgerald Theater back in October -- our friends in the Preservation Hall Jazz Band will stop by for a song or two. Chris Thile's Song of the Month series continues, with duet partner Gaby Moreno, Rich Dworsky on keys, guitarist Chris Eldridge, Alan Hampton on bass, drummer Ted Poor, and Gabe Witcher on fiddle. After a week spent looking for sun, will Tom Papa find it at the southern end of the Mississippi? Find out when he checks in from Out In America.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 1:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Reza Aslan Reza Aslan is an internationally acclaimed writer and religious scholar. His books include No God But God: The Origins, Evolution, and Future of Islam, Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth, How to Win a Cosmic War: God, Globalization and the End of the War on Terror (published in paperback as Beyond Fundamentalism), and most recently God: A Human History. Aslans degrees include a Bachelor of Arts in Religious Studies, a Master of Theological Studies, a PhD in the Sociology of Religions, and a Master of Fine Arts from the University of Iowa, where he was named the Truman Capote Fellow in Fiction. Born in Iran, he now lives in Los Angeles, where he is an associate professor of creative writing at the University of California, Riverside, and a cooperative faculty member in the department of religion.
  • 2:00 pm
    On the Media The #MeToo Backlash Begins This week, the online magazine Babe published an expos describing a sexual encounter between comedian Aziz Ansari and "Grace," an anonymous woman, in which consent lines were blurred, though not necessarily crossed. Thus, a new and contentious phase in the #MeToo movement began. Some critics, like The Atlantic's Caitlin Flanagan and the New York Times' Bari Weiss, argued that this was a case of unnecessary humiliation, bringing an everyday encounter into the frame of a movement that's better focused on clear-cut cases of assault. Others argued that the article sparked an important and long overdue dialogue around consent. Brooke speaks with Vox.com's Caroline Framke about why this case is different from the #MeToo revelations thus far and where the conversation might be going from here.
  • 3:00 pm
    TED Radio Hour The Money Paradox How does money motivate, trick, satisfy and disappoint us? In this hour, TED speakers share insights into our relationship with money.
  • 4:00 pm
  • 5:00 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    Latino USA Taking Back the Trees The small town of Chern in Michoacn, Mexico sits amidst pine trees, and most of its residents make money off of the resin they tap. But when drug cartels turned their attention to Chern's pine trees and began illegally logging them to make a quick buck, the townspeople decided that enough was enough. Plusthe story of a man who became a wrestling champion despite being born with only one leg. And, Spanish indie-pop artist El Guincho breaks down his production process.
  • 7:00 pm
    Radio Specials Planet Money: 4, 3, 2, 1-- Liftoff It's launch day for the Planet Money satellite, POD - 1, and the intrepid Planeteers discover all the superstitions and complications of going to space. They eat the traditional pancake breakfast with the launch team. And learn that the one time they did not eat pancakes, the rocket didn't make it to orbit. That's not the only launch danger. Will Marshall, the CEO of their satellite partner Planet, always makes a speech where he lists what can go wrong (BOOM). But Will says taking risks is actually part of the business plan. Even if POD - 1 does make it to space, there is one more obstacle. Actually, there are thousands of them. Little bits of space junk. How does a rocket and a satellite avoid them all? Visit the people who make sure we have a clear path to the heavens.
  • 7:30 pm
    Radio Specials How I Built This with Guy Raz: Sara Blakely of Spanx Guy Raz talks to Sara Blakely, founder of Spanx. At 27, Sara Blakely was selling fax machines and desperate to reinvent her life. So she came up with Spanx hosiery that eliminates panty lines and set to work building her business.
  • 8:00 pm
    Marketplace Weekend Trump Year One, College Credit Its been a year since the Trump administration took office what the past year has meant for regulations. Plus, getting students college credit while theyre in high school has been all the rage but where exactly is the payoff?
  • 9:00 pm
    KQED Newsroom Adam Schiff, Trumps First Year, Womens March, W. Kamau Bell First, Newsroom talks to Congressman Adam Schiff about the latest news in the ongoing investigation into possible Russian meddling in the 2016 elections, including the refusal of Steve Bannon to divulge information, Trumps former chief strategist, to answer questions. Then a political analysis of Trump's First Year. Theyll look at the key issues and controversial decisions that have marked President Donald Trumps first year in office as Congress faces a deadline to keep the government funded. Plus, a year ago, millions of women gathered around the world for The Womens March. They rallied for womens rights and protested President Trumps inauguration. The first anniversary is this weekend and the show talks to the organizers about whether women are stepping into the political arena and what their goals are. Finally, comedian and CNN host W. Kamau Bell talks about teaming up with the Oakland Symphony to bring his musical playlist to a wider audience.
  • 9:30 pm
    Cambridge Forum Deadly Double Helix: Part 1 Danielle Allen, Director of the Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard, discusses her new memoir CUZ. The book documents the events which conspired to cause the untimely death of her young cousin, Michael, on the streets of Los Angeles in 2009. A deadly double helix of narcotics and street gangs ultimately entrapped her cousin, as with countless others, leading to his incarceration and death.
  • 10:00 pm
    Truth, Politics, and Power with Neal Conan The F Word A year ago, on the debut episode of Truth Politics and Power the show asked whether it was fair or accurate to describe the new President as a fascist. After twelve months, their Inaugural Edition continues to resonate. Hear conversations with Hitler biographer Volker Ullrich and Historian Robert Kagan.
  • 11:00 pm
    Tech Nation Animatronics for Social Good On this weeks Tech Nation, Aaron Horowitz and Hannah Chung, Co-Founders of Sproutel and Designers of My Special AFLAC Duck, for children with cancer. Then on Tech Nation Health, Dr. Todd Brady, CEO of Aldeyra describes their work on a disease which affects one-third of people. It led to a new drug helping patients with a very rare disease - Sjgren-Larsson Syndrome.
  • 12:00 am
    On the Media The #MeToo Backlash Begins This week, the online magazine Babe published an expos describing a sexual encounter between comedian Aziz Ansari and "Grace," an anonymous woman, in which consent lines were blurred, though not necessarily crossed. Thus, a new and contentious phase in the #MeToo movement began. Some critics, like The Atlantic's Caitlin Flanagan and the New York Times' Bari Weiss, argued that this was a case of unnecessary humiliation, bringing an everyday encounter into the frame of a movement that's better focused on clear-cut cases of assault. Others argued that the article sparked an important and long overdue dialogue around consent. Brooke speaks with Vox.com's Caroline Framke about why this case is different from the #MeToo revelations thus far and where the conversation might be going from here.
Sunday, January 21, 2018

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